Sally Hetherington

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Human and Hope Association

Cambodia, Charity, Child Protection, Crowdfunding, Developing countries, Education, Empowerment, Human and Hope Association

Providing education to the children of Cambodia

When we recruited students for a second daily preschool class at Human and Hope Association in October 2013, *Srey (not her real name for child protection purposes, so I am using Srey as it means ‘girl’ in Khmer) was one of three students we recruited. Our Education Coordinator had struggled to find students, so Srey studied in the class with just one other girl for an hour a day. Seeing that these two girls were lonely, as they only had each other to play with, our Education Coordinator  ...

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Cambodia, Empowerment, Human and Hope Association, Women

Is your husband being nice to you?

“Is your husband being nice to you?” “Yes, better than before. But he is jealous of me nowadays.” “Why is he jealous? Because you are earning more money than him?” “Because I went away for two days with the staff. The villagers mocked him as he had to look after the children instead of his wife.” “Don’t ever let what he says make you feel bad. Just remember how far you have come in your life, and be proud of yourself!”  ...

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Cambodia, Developing countries, Human and Hope Association, Voluntourism

The importance of championing for local communities

“Cambodians should help themselves and their own people whenever they can. By running their own NGO’s, they can demonstrate the ability to successfully operate organisations on their own. They then become good role models to other organisations that depend on foreigners and give Cambodians confidence in themselves. When Cambodians run their own NGO’s, they eliminate the assumption of some Cambodians and foreigners who say that some jobs can only be undertaken by foreign nationals. It is  ...

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Cambodia, Human and Hope Association, Social Enterprise

Is it cultural?

Something I struggled with during my time in Cambodia was identifying whether to accept a situation as cultural, or challenging it. Although I wanted to ensure I was acting in a respectful way, there were some things I didn’t know whether to let slide. Take, for example, the day I went out into the village surrounding HHA in 2013. I had headed out with two of my workmates so I could take photos of their community outreach. It was while we were at the house of a girl who was about to start  ...

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